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Area of Great Landscape Value

An area of land in England which is considered to have a particular scenic value, and is therefore afforded a degree of protection by local authorities. The designation was established under the Town and Country Planning Act 1947. If an area is designated as an AGLV, this restricts development in the area, especially if it will affect the distinctive character or quality of the landscape.

Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

An area of high scenic quality which has statutory protection in order to conserve and enhance the natural beauty of its landscape. AONB landscapes range from rugged coastline to water meadows to gentle lowland and upland moors.  They are different from National Parks because of their more limited opportunities for extensive outdoor recreation.  Natural England has a statutory power to designate land as Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty under the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000.

Conservation Area

Most conservation areas are designated by the Council as the local planning authority. English Heritage can designate conservation areas in London, where they have to consult the relevant London Borough Council and obtain the consent of the Secretary of State for National Heritage. The Secretary of State can also designate in exceptional circumstances - usually where the area is of more than local interest.

Consultation

Public consultation, or simply consultation, is a regulatory process by which the public's input on matters affecting them is sought. Its main goals are in improving the efficiency, transparency and public involvement in large-scale projects or laws and policies. It usually involves notification (to publicise the matter to be consulted on), consultation (a two-way flow of information and opinion exchange) as well as participation (involving interest groups in the drafting of policy or legislation).

Three forms of interaction are often mingled with public consultation programmes, complementing and overlapping each other:

  • Notification.
    It involves the communication of information on regulatory decisions to the public, and it is a key building block of the rule of law. It is a one-way process of communication in which the public plays a passive consumer role of government information. Notification does not, itself, constitute consultation, but can be a first step. In this view, prior notification allows stakeholders the time to prepare themselves for upcoming consultations.
  • Consultation.
    It involves actively seeking the opinions of interested and affected groups. It is a two-way flow of information, which may occur at any stage of regulatory development, from problem identification to evaluation of existing regulation. It may be a one-stage process or, as it is increasingly the case, a continuing dialogue. Consultation is increasingly concerned with the objective of gathering information to facilitate the drafting of higher quality regulation.
  • Participation.
    It is the active involvement of interest groups in the formulation of regulatory objectives, policies and approaches, or in the drafting of regulatory texts. Participation is usually meant to facilitate implementation and improve compliance, consensus, and political support. Governments are likely to offer stakeholders a role in regulatory development, implementation and/or enforcement in circumstances in which they wish to increase the sense of “ownership” of, or commitment to, the regulations beyond what is likely to be achieved via a purely consultative approach.

Campaign for the Protection of Rural England

A registered charity with over 60,000 members and supporters. Formed in 1926 by Sir Patrick Abercrombie to limit urban sprawl and ribbon development. There is a specific branch, CPRE Surrey, that represents the interests of its members in Surrey.

Thursday the 26th - Published by Normandy Action Group, 166 Glaziers Lane, Guildford GU3 2EB - with thanks to Keith Witham, Surrey County Councillor - Hostgator Coupon Template